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Frontier Nissan Frontier/HB/Truck Discussion Forum

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  #1  
Old 10-21-2017, 01:06 PM
boyboy12 boyboy12 is offline
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Default Cat & o2

Can anyone give me an idea how hard it's going to be to change cats on my 2001 frontier 4banger. 2wd
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Old 10-21-2017, 02:17 PM
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smj999smj smj999smj is offline
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Difficulty is subjective and depends on a number of factors, from your mechanical experience and availability of tools and equipment to what kind of condition the exhaust is in, i.e. the amount of rust on the system, if any. For a mechanic working on a lift with air tools, etc., it's not too bad of a job providing there isn't a lot of bolt breaking in the process. It's all unbolt, replace parts and gaskets (and maybe some hardware) and re-assemble. If bolts break that attache the upstream converter to the exhaust manifold, if the job is being done on the ground with the vehicle on jack stands and/or if one isn't that familiar with exhaust work, then the job can get a lot more difficult. Usually in a system with front and rear converters, the only reason to replace the rear converter is if it is rusted through or the inner substrate breaks and is rattling...or, if a bad head gasket failure has dumped a lot of coolant into the exhaust system. In most cases, the upstream converter acts like a sort of filter, for lack of a better term, to the rear converter. The rear converter is also not monitored by the front and rear oxygen sensors in this vehicle, so it is not subject to causing an efficiency code to trigger if the converter becomes such.
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Old 10-22-2017, 05:12 AM
boyboy12 boyboy12 is offline
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Thanks, now for the next question. Has anyone tried the non fouler trick on the down stream o2 sensor?
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Old 10-22-2017, 01:52 PM
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Sometimes it works for getting rid of catalyst efficiency codes, although the CEL eliminators with the 90 degree bend tend to work a little better, but are quite a bit more expensive. The good thing about using the anti-foulers is that they don't cost a lot, so if it doesn't work, you aren't out a lot of money. The other thing is that if you live in a state like California where they are strict with their state inspections, it would fail inspection if they see it as it is considered tampering with an emission control device.
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